Gavilan College celebrates 400 years of Don Quijote

The History of Don Quixote - The Second Part

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The History of the
Valorous & Witty Knight-Errant Don Quixote of the Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes, Translated by Thomas Shelton

The Second Part

CHAPTER XV: Who the Knight of the Looking-glasses and his Squire were

 

DON QUIXOTE was extremely contented, glad, and vainglorious, that he had subdued so valiant a knight as he imagined he of the Looking-glasses was, from whose knightly word he hoped to know if the enchantment of his mistress were certain, since of necessity the said vanquished knight was to return, on pain of not being so, to relate what had happened unto him; but Don Quixote thought one thing, and he of the Glasses another, though for the present he minded nothing but to seek where he might cerecloth himself. The history then tells us that, when the bachelor Samson Carrasco advised Don Quixote to prosecute his forsaken cavallery, he entered first of all into counsel with the vicar and the barber to know what means they should use that Don Quixote might be persuaded to stay at home peaceably and quietly, without troubling himself with his unlucky adventures; from which counsel, by the common consent of all and particular opinion of Carrasco, it was agreed that Don Quixote should abroad again, since it was impossible to stay him; and that Samson should meet him upon the way like a knight-errant, and should fight with him, since an occasion would not be wanting, and so to overcome him, which would not be difficult, and that there should be a covenant and agreement that the vanquished should stand to courtesy of the vanquisher, so that, Don Quixote being vanquished, the bachelor knight should command him to get him home to his town and house, and not to stir from thence in two years after, or till he should command him to the contrary; the which in all likelihood Don Quixote, once vanquished, would infallibly accomplish, as unwilling to contradict or be defective in the laws of knighthood, and it might so be that, in this time of sequestering, he might forget all his vanities, or they might find out some convenient remedy for his madness. Carrasco accepted of it, and Thomas Cecial offered himself to be his squire—Sancho Panza’s neighbour and gossip, a merry knave and a witty. Samson armed himself, as you have heard, and Thomas Cecial fitted the false nose to his own, and afterwards he clapt on his vizard, that he might not be known by his gossip when they should meet. So they held on the same voyage with Don Quixote, and they came even just as he was in the adventure of Death’s waggon; and at last they lighted on them in the wood, where what befel them the discreet reader hath seen; and, if it had not been for the strange opinion that Don Quixote had, that the bachelor was not the self-same man, he had been spoiled for ever for taking another degree, since he missed his mark.

Thomas Cecial, that saw what ill use he had made of his hopes, and the bad effect that his journey took, said to the bachelor, ‘Truly, Master Samson, we have our deserts; things are easily conceived, and enterprises easily undertaken, but very hardly performed. Don Quixote mad, we wise; but he is gone away sound and merry, you are here bruised and sorrowful; let us know, then, who is the greatest madman, he that is so and cannot do withal, or he that is so for his pleasure.’ To which quoth Samson ‘The difference between these madmen is, that he that of necessity is so will always remain so, and he that accidentally is so may leave it when he will.’ ‘Since it is so,’ said Thomas Cecial, ‘I that for my pleasure was mad, when I would needs be your squire, for the same reason I would leave the office and return home to my own house.’ ‘‘Tis fit you should,’ said Samson; ‘yet to think that I will do so till I have soundly banged Don Quixote is vain. And now I go not about to restore him to his wits, but to revenge myself on him; for the intolerable pain I feel in my ribs will not permit me a more charitable discourse.’

Thus they two went on parleying till they came to a town where by chance they lighted upon a bone-setter, who cured the unfortunate Samson. Thomas Cecial went home and left him, and he stayed musing upon his revenge and the history hereafter will return to him, which at present must make merry with Don Quixote.

Gavilan College celebrates 400 years of Don Quijote

The History of Don Quixote - The Second Part

Gavilan Spanish Questions or comments Bibliographic Record Index page Previous page Top Next page