Gavilan College celebrates 400 years of Don Quijote

Don Quixote de la Mancha, translated by Charles Jarvis

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-[598]-

The Life and Exploits
of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes, Translated by Charles Jarvis, Esq.

The Second Part
 

CHAPTER LXXII: How Don Quixote and Sancho arrived at their Village.

 

Don Quixote and Sancho stayed all the day at the inn in that village, waiting for night; the one to finish his task of whipping in the fields, and the other to see the success of it, in which consisted the accomplishment of his wishes. At this juncture came a traveller on horseback to the inn, with three or four servants, one of whom said to him, who seemed to be the master of them: "Here, Signor Don Alvaro Tarfe, your worship may pass the heat of the day; the lodging seems to be cool and cleanly." Don Quixote hearing this, said to Sancho: "I am mistaken, Sancho, if, when I turned over the second part of my history, I had not a glimpse of this Don Alvaro Tarfe." "It may be so," answered Sancho; "let him first alight, and then we will question him." The gentleman alighted, and the landlady showed him into a ground room, opposite to that of Don Quixote, hung likewise with painted serge. This new-arrived cavalier undressed and equipped himself for coolness, and stepping out to the porch, which was airy and spacious, where Don Quixote was walking backwards and forwards, he asked him: "Pray, Sir, which way is your worship travelling?" And Don Quixote answered: "To a village not far off, where I was born. And pray, Sir, which way may you be travelling?" "I, Sir," answered the gentleman, "am going to Granada, which is my native country." "And a good country it is," replied Don Quixote. "But, Sir, oblige me so far as to tell me your name; for I conceive it imports me to know it, more than I can well express." "My name is Don Alvaro Tarfe," answered the new guest. To which Don Quixote replied: "Then, I presume, your worship is that Don Alvaro Tarfe mentioned in the 'Second Part of the History of Don Quixote de la Mancha,' lately printed, and published by a certain modern author." "The very same," answered the gentleman, "and that Don Quixote, the hero of the said history, was a very great friend of mine; and I was the person who drew him from his native place: at least I prevailed upon him to be present at certain jousts and tournaments held at Saragossa, whither I was going myself; and, in truth, I did him a great many kindnesses, and saved his back from being well stroked by the hangman for being too bold." "Pray tell me, Signor Don Alvaro," said Don Quixote, "am I anything like that Don Quixote you speak of?" "No, in truth," answered the guest, "not in the least." "And this Don Quixote," said ours, "had he a squire with him, called Sancho Panza?" -[599]- "Yes, he had," answered Don Alvaro; "and though he had the reputation of being very pleasant, I never heard him say any one thing that had any pleasantry in it." "I verily believe it," quoth Sancho straight; "for it is not everybody's talent to say pleasant things; and this Sancho your worship speaks of, Signor Gentleman, must be some very great rascal, idiot, and knave into the bargain: for the true Sancho Panza am I, who have more witty conceits than there are drops in a shower. Try but the experiment, Sir, and follow me but one year, and you will find that they drop from me at every step, and are so many, and so pleasant, that for the most part, without knowing what I say, I make everybody laugh that hears me: and the true Don Quixote de la Mancha, the renowned, the valiant, the discreet, the enamoured, the undoer of injuries, the defender of pupils and orphans, the protector of widows, the murderer of damsels, he, who has the peerless Dulcinea del Toboso for his sole mistress, is this gentleman here present, my master: any other Don Quixote whatever, and any other Sancho Panza, is all mockery, and a mere dream." "Before God, I believe it," answered Don Alvaro; "for you have said more pleasant things, friend, in four words you have spoken, than that other Sancho Panza in all I ever heard him say, though that was a great deal: for he was more gluttonous than well-spoken, and more stupid than pleasant; and I take it for granted that the enchanters, who persecute the good Don Quixote, have had a mind to persecute me too with the bad one; but I know not what to say; for I durst have sworn I had left him under cure in the Nuncio of Toledo's house, and now here starts up another Don Quixote, very different from mine." "I know not," said Don Quixote, "whether I am the good one; but I can say I am not the bad one; and as a proof of what I say, you must know, dear Signor Alvaro Tarfe, that I never was in Saragossa in all the days of my life: on the contrary, having been told that this imaginary Don Quixote was at the tournaments of that city, I resolved not to go thither, that I might make him a liar in the face of all the world; and so I went directly to Barcelona, that register of courtesy, asylum of strangers, hospital of the poor, native country of the valiant, avenger of the injured, agreeable seat of firm friendship, and for situation and beauty singular. And, though what befell me there be not very much to my satisfaction, but, on the contrary, much to my sorrow, the having seen that city enables me the better to bear it. In a word, Signor Don Alvaro Tarfe, I am Don Quixote de la Mancha, the same that fame speaks of, and not that unhappy wretch, who would usurp my name, and arrogate to himself the honour of my exploits. And, therefore, I conjure you, Sir, as you are a gentleman, to make a declaration before the magistrate of this town, that you never saw me before in your life, and that I am not the Don Quixote printed in the second part; nor this Sancho Panza, my squire, him you knew." "That I will, with all my heart," answered Don Alvaro; "though it surprises me to see two Don Quixotes and two Sanchos at the same time, as different in their actions as alike in their names. And, I say again, I am now assured that I have not seen what I have seen, nor in respect to me, has that happened which has happened." "Without doubt," quoth Sancho, "your worship must be enchanted, like my Lady Dulcinea del Toboso; and would to Heaven your disenchantment depended upon my giving myself another three thousand and odd lashes, as I do for her; for I would lay them on without interest or reward." "I understand not this business of lashes," replied Don Alvaro. Sancho answered, it -[600]- was too long to tell at present, but he would give him an account, if they happened to travel the same road.

Dinner-time was now come: Don Quixote and Don Alvaro dined together. By chance the magistrate of the town came into the inn, with a notary; and Don Quixote desired of him, that Don Alvaro Tarfe, the gentleman there present, might depose before his worship that he did not know Don Quixote de la Mancha, there present also, and that he was not the man handed about in a printed history, intitled, "The Second Part of Don Quixote de la Mancha," written by such a one de Avellaneda, a native of Tordesillas. In short, the magistrate proceeded according to form: the deposition was worded as strong as could be in such cases; at which Don Quixote and Sancho were overjoyed, as if this attestation had been of the greatest importance to them, and as if the difference between the two Don Quixotes and the two Sanchos were not evident enough from their words and actions. Many compliments and offers of service passed between Don Alvaro and Don Quixote, in which the great Manchegan showed his discretion in such manner, that he convinced Don Alvaro Tarfe of the error he was in; who was persuaded he must needs be enchanted, since he had touched with his hand two such contrary Don Quixotes.

The evening came: they departed from that place, and at the distance of about half a league, the road parted into two; one led to Don Quixote's village, and the other to where Don Alvaro was going. In this little way Don Quixote related to him the misfortune of his defeat, and the enchantment and cure of Dulcinea; which was new cause of admiration to Don Alvaro, who embracing Don Quixote and Sancho, went on his way, and Don Quixote his.

That night he passed among some other trees, to give Sancho an opportunity of finishing his discipline, which he did after the same manner as he had done the night before, more at the expense of the bark of the beeches than of his back, of which he was so careful, that the lashes he gave it would not have brushed off a fly, that had been upon it. The deceived Don Quixote was very punctual in telling the strokes, and found that, including those of the foregoing night, they amounted to three thousand and twenty-nine. One would have thought the sun himself had risen earlier than usual to behold the sacrifice; by whose light they resumed their journey, discoursing together of Don Alvaro's mistake, and how prudently they had contrived to procure his deposition before a magistrate, and in so authentic a form.

He looked narrowly at every woman he met.
He looked narrowly at every woman he met.

That day, and that night, they travelled without any occurrence worth relating, unless it be that Sancho finished his task that night; at which Don Quixote was above measure pleased, and waited for the day, to see if he could light on his lady, the disenchanted Dulcinea in his way; and continuing his journey, he looked narrowly at every woman he met, to see if she were Dulcinea del Toboso, holding it for infallible that Merlin's promises could not lie. With these thoughts and desires, they ascended a little hill, from whence they discovered their village; which as soon as Sancho beheld, he kneeled down, and said: "Open thine eyes, O desired country, and behold thy son Sancho Panza, returning to thee again, if not very rich, yet very well whipped: open thine arms, and receive likewise thy son Don Quixote, who if he comes conquered by another's hand, yet he comes a conqueror of himself, which, as I have heard him say, is the greatest victory that can be desired. Money I have; for if I have been -[601]- well whipped, I am come off like a gentleman." "Leave these fooleries, Sancho," answered Don Quixote, "and let us go directly home to our tillage, where we will give full scope to our imaginations, and settle the plan we intend to govern ourselves by, in our pastoral life." This said, they descended the hill, and went directly to the village.

 

Gavilan College celebrates 400 years of Don Quijote

Don Quixote de la Mancha, translated by Charles Jarvis

Gavilan Spanish Questions or comments Bibliographic Record Index page Previous page Top Next page