Gavilan College celebrates 400 years of Don Quijote

Don Quixote de la Mancha, translated by Charles Jarvis

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-[303]-

The Life and Exploits
of the Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote de la Mancha

By Miguel de Cervantes, Translated by Charles Jarvis, Esq.

The Second Part
 

CHAPTER II: Which treats of the notable Quarrel between Sancho Panza and Don Quixote's Niece and Housekeeper, with other pleasant Occurrences.

 

The history relates that the outcry, which Don Quixote, the priest, and the barber heard, was raised by the niece and the housekeeper, who were defending the door against Sancho Panza, who was striving to get in to see Don Quixote. "What would this paunch-gutted fellow have in this house?" said they: "get you to your own, brother; for it is you, and no other, by whom our master is seduced and led astray, and carried rambling up and down the highways." To which Sancho replied: "Mistress Housekeeper for the devil, it is I that am seduced and led astray, and carried rambling up and down the highways, and not your master; it was he who led me this dance, and you deceive yourselves half in half. He inveigled me from home with fair speeches, promising me an island, which I still hope for." "May the damned islands choke thee, accursed Sancho!" answered the niece;" and pray what are islands? Are they anything eatable, glutton, cormorant as thou art?" "They are not to be eaten," replied Sancho, "but governed; and better governments than any four cities, or four justiceships at court." "For all that," said the housekeeper, "you come not in here, sack of mischiefs, bundle of rogueries! Get you home, and govern there; go, plough and cart, and cease pretending to islands or islanders." The priest and the barber took a great deal of pleasure in hearing this dialogue between the three. But Don Quixote, fearing lest Sancho should blunder out some unseasonable follies, and touch upon some points not very much to his credit, called to him, and ordered the women to hold their tongues, and let him in. Sancho entered, and the priest and the barber took their leave of Don Quixote, of whose cure they despaired, perceiving how bent he was upon his extravagances, and how intoxicated with the folly of his unhappy chivalries. And therefore the priest said to the barber, "You will see, neighbour, when we least think of it, our gentleman take the other flight." "I make no doubt of it," answered the barber: "yet I do not so much wonder at the madness of the knight, as at the simplicity of the squire, who is so possessed with the business of the island, that I am persuaded all the demonstrations in the world cannot beat it out of his noddle." "God help them!" said the priest; "and let us be upon the watch, and we shall see the drift of this machine of absurdities, of such a knight, and such a squire, who one would think were cast in the same mould; and, indeed, the madness of the master without the follies of the man would not be worth a farthing." "True," said the barber; "and I should be very glad to know what they two are now talking of." "I lay my life," answered the priest, "the niece and the housekeeper will tell us all by and by; for they are not of a temper to forbear listening."

In the meanwhile, Don Quixote had shut himself up in his chamber with Sancho only, and said to him: "I am very sorry, Sancho, you should say, and stand in it, that it was I who drew you out of your cottage, when you know that I myself stayed not in my own house. We set out together; we went on together; and together we performed our travels. We both ran the same fortune and the same chance. If you were once tossed in a blanket, I have been thrashed a hundred times; and herein only have I -[304]- had the advantage of you." "And reason good," answered Sancho; "for, as your worship holds, misfortunes belong more properly to knights-errant themselves, than to their squires." "You mistake, Sancho," said Don Quixote;" for according to the saying, Quando caput dolet etc." "I understand no other language than my own," replied Sancho. "I mean," said Don Quixote, "that, when the head aches, all the members ache also; and therefore I, being your master and lord, am your head, and you are a part of me, as being my servant; and for this reason, the ill that does or shall affect me, must affect you also; and so on the contrary." "Indeed," quoth Sancho, "it should be so; but when I, as a limb, was tossed in the blanket, my head stood on t'other side of the pales, beholding me frisking in the air, without feeling any pain at all; and since the members are bound to grieve at the ills of the head, that also, in requital, ought to do the like for them." "Would you insinuate now," replied Don Quixote, "that I was not grieved when I saw you tossed? If that be your meaning, say no more, nor so much as think it; for I felt more pain then in my mind than you did in your body.

"But no more of this at present; for a time will come, when we may set this matter upon its right bottom. In the meantime, tell me, friend Sancho, what do folks say of me about this town? What opinion have the common people of me? What think the gentlemen and the cavaliers? What is said of my prowess, of my exploits, and of my courtesy? What discourse is there of the design I have engaged in, to revive and restore to the world the long-forgotten order of chivalry? In short, Sancho, I would have you tell me whatever you have heard concerning these matters; and this you must do, without adding to the good, or taking from the bad, one tittle; for this is the part of faithful vassals to tell their lords the truth in its native simplicity and proper figure, neither enlarged by adulation, nor diminished out of any other idle regard. And I would have you, Sancho, learn by the way, that, if naked truth could come to the ears of princes, without the disguise of flattery, we should see happier days, and former ages would be deemed as iron, in comparison of ours, which would then be esteemed the golden age. Let this advertisement, Sancho, be a caution to you to give me an ingenious and faithful account of what you know concerning the matters I have inquired about." "That I will, with all my heart, Sir," answered Sancho, "on condition that your worship shall not be angry at what I say, since you will have me show you the naked truth, without arraying her in any other dress than that in which she appeared to me." "I will in no wise be angry," replied Don Quixote;" you may speak freely, Sancho, and without any circumlocution."

"First and foremost then," said Sancho, "the common people take your worship for a downright madman, and me for no less a fool. The gentlemen say, that, not containing yourself within the bounds of gentility, you have taken upon you the style of Don, and invaded the dignity of knighthood, with no more than a paltry vineyard and a couple of acres of land, with a tatter before and another behind. The cavaliers say, they would not have the gentlemen set themselves in opposition to them, especially those gentlemen-esquires, who clout their shoes, and take up the fallen stitches of their black stockings with green silk." "That," said Don Quixote, "is no reflection upon me; for I always go well clad, and my clothes never patched; a little torn they may be, but more so through the fretting of my armour, than by length of time." "As to what concerns -[305]- your valour, courtesy, achievements, and your undertaking," quoth Sancho, "there are very different opinions. Some say, mad but humorous; others, valiant but unfortunate; others, courteous but impertinent; and thus they run divisions upon us, till they leave neither your worship nor me a whole bone in our skins." "Take notice, Sancho," said Don Quixote, "that wherever virtue is found in any eminent degree, it is always persecuted. Few or none of the famous men of times past escaped being calumniated by their malicious contemporaries. Julius Caesar, the most courageous, the most prudent, and most valiant captain, was noted for being ambitious, and somewhat unclean both in his apparel and manners. Alexander, whose exploits gained him the surname of Great, is said to have had a little smack of the drunkard. Hercules, with all his labours, is censured for being lascivious and effeminate. Don Galaor, brother of Amadis de Gaul, was taxed with being quarrelsome, and his brother with being a whimperer. So that, Sancho, amidst so many calumnies cast on the worthy, mine may very well pass, if they are no more than those you have mentioned." "Body of my father! there is the jest," replied Sancho. "What then, is there more yet behind?" said Don Quixote.

The bachelor Sampson Carrasco.
The bachelor Sampson Carrasco.

"The tail remains still to be flayed," quoth Sancho; "all hitherto has been tarts and cheesecakes; but if your worship has a mind to know the very bottom of these calumnies people bestow upon you, I will bring one hither presently, who shall tell you them all, without missing a tittle; for, last night arrived the son of Bartholomew Carrasco, who comes from studying at Salamanca, having taken the degree of bachelor; and when I went to bid him welcome home, he told me that the history of your worship is already printed in books, under the title of 'The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote de la Mancha '; and he says it mentions me too by my very name of Sancho Panza, and the Lady Dulcinea del Toboso, and several other things which passed between us two only; insomuch that I crossed myself out of pure amazement to think how the historian, who wrote it, could come to know them." "Depend upon it, Sancho," said Don Quixote, "that the author of this our history must be some sage enchanter; for nothing is hidden from them that they have a mind to write." "A sage, and an ^chanter!" quoth Sancho, "why the Bachelor Sampson Carrasco (for that is his name) says the author of this history is called Cid Hamet Berengena." "This is a Moorish name," answered Don Quixote. "It may be so," replied Sancho; "for I have heard that your Moors, for the most part, are lovers of Berengena's."(128) "Sancho," said Don Quixote, "you must mistake the surname of that same Cid, which in Arabic signifies a lord."(129) "It may be so," answered Sancho; "but if your worship wishes me to bring him hither, I will fly to fetch him." "You will do me a singular pleasure, friend," said Don Quixote;" for I am surprised at what you have told me, and I shall not eat a bit that will do me good till I am informed of all." "Then I am going for him," answered Sancho; and, leaving his master, he went to seek the bachelor, with whom he returned soon after; and between them there passed a most pleasant conversation.

 

Gavilan College celebrates 400 years of Don Quijote

Don Quixote de la Mancha, translated by Charles Jarvis

Gavilan Spanish Questions or comments Bibliographic Record Index page Previous page Top Next page