Gavilan College celebrates 400 years of Don Quijote

Don Quixote de la Mancha, translated by Charles Jarvis

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Listed by Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes

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The life and exploits of the ingenious gentleman
Don Quixote de la Mancha

Translated from the original Spanish of
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
by

Charles Jarvis, Esq.



Carefully revised and corrected. To which is prefixed a life of the author.
With sixteen illustrations by W. H. Robinson.

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Contents

  Life of the Author

List of illustrations

Author's Preface to the First Part

Notes pertaining to the First Part


      Don Quixote - The First Part
 

I. Which treats of the quality and manner of life of the renowned Gentleman Don Quixote de la Mancha
II. Which treats of the first sally the ingenious Don Quixote made from his Village
III. In which is related the pleasant method Don Quixote took to be dubbed a knight
IV. Of what befell our Knight after he had sallied out from the Inn
V. Wherein is continued the narration of our Knight's misfortune
VI. Of the pleasant and grand scrutiny made by the Priest and the Barber in our ingenious gentleman's library
VII. Of the second sally of our good knight Don Quixote de la Mancha
VIII. Of the good success which the valorous Don Quixote had, in the dreadful and never-before-imagined adventure of the windmills, with other events worthy to be recorded
IX. Wherein is concluded, and an end put to, the stupendous battle between the vigorous Biscainer and the valiant Manchegan
X. Of the discourse Don Quixote had with his good squire Sancho Panza
XI. Of what befell Don Quixote with certain Goatherds
XII. What a certain Goatherd related to those that were with Don Quixote
XIII. The conclusion of the story of the Shepherdess Marcela, with other incidents
XIV. Wherein are rehearsed the despairing verses of the deceased Shepherd, with other unexpected events
XV. Wherein is related the unfortunate adventure which befell Don Quixote in meeting with certain bloody-minded Yangueses
XVI. Of what happened to the ingenious Gentleman in the Inn, which he imagined to be a castle
XVII. Wherein are continued the numberless hardships which the brave Don Quixote, and his good Squire Sancho Panza underwent in the Inn, which he unhappily took for a castle
XVIII. In which is rehearsed the discourse which Sancho Panza held with his master Don Quixote; with other adventures worth relating
XIX. Of the sage discourse that passed between Sancho and his master, and the succeeding adventure of the dead body, with other famous occurrences
XX. Of the adventure (the like never before seen or heard of) achieved by the renowned Don Quixote de la Mancha, with less hazard than ever any was achieved by the most famous knight in the world
XXI. Which treats of the high adventure and rich prize of Mambrino's helmet, with other things which befell our invincible knight
XXII. How Don Quixote set at liberty several unfortunate persons who were carrying, much against their wills, to a place they did not like
XXIII. Of what befell the renowned Don Quixote in the Sable Mountain, being one of the most curious and uncommon adventures of any related in this faithful history
XXIV. A continuation of the adventure of the Sable Mountain
XXV. Which treats of the strange things that befell the valiant knight of La Mancha in the Sable Mountain, and how he imitated the penance of Beltenebros
XXVI. A continuation of the refinements practised by Don Quixote as a lover in the Sable Mountain
XXVII. How the Priest and the Barber put their design in execution, with other matters worthy to be recited in this history
XXVIII. Which treats of the new and agreeable adventure that befell the Priest and the Barber in the same mountain
XXIX. Which treats of the beautiful Dorothea's discretion, with other very ingenious and entertaining particulars
XXX. Which treats of the pleasant and ingenious method of drawing our enamoured knight from the very rigorous penance he had imposed on himself
XXXI. Of the relishing conversation which passed between Don Quixote and his squire Sancho Panza, with other accidents
XXXII. Which treats of what befell Don Quixote's whole company in the inn
XXXIII. In which is recited the "Novel of the Curious Impertinent"
XXXIV. In which is continued the "Novel of the Curious Impertinent"
XXXV. The conclusion of the "Novel of the Curious Impertinent", with the dreadful battle betwixt Don Quixote and certain Wine-skins
XXXVI. Which treats of other uncommon accidents that happened at the Inn
XXXVII. Wherein is continued the history of the famous Infanta Micomicona, with other pleasant adventures
XXXVIII. The continuation of Don Quixote's curious discourse upon arms and letters
XXXIX. Wherein the Captive relates his life and adventures
XL. In which is continued the history of the Captive
XLI. Wherein the Captive continues the story of his adventures
XLII. Which treats of what farther happened in the Inn, and of many other things worthy to be known
XLIII. Which treats of the agreeable history of the young Muleteer, with other strange accidents that happened in the Inn
XLIV. A continuation of the unheard-of adventures of the Inn
XLV. In which the dispute concerning Mambrino's helmet and the pannel is decided, with other adventures that really and truly happened
XLVI. In which is finished the notable adventure of the Troopers of the Holy Brotherhood; with the great ferocity of our good knight, Don Quixote
XLVII. Of the strange and wonderful manner in which Don Quixote de la Mancha was enchanted, with other remarkable occurrences
XLVIII. In which the Canon prosecutes the subject of books of chivalry, with other matters worthy of his genius
XLIX. Of the ingenious conference between Sancho Panza and his master Don Quixote
L. Of the ingenious contest between Don Quixote and the Canon, with other accidents
LI. Which treats of what the Goatherd related to all those who accompanied Don Quixote
LII. Of the quarrel between Don Quixote and the Goatherd, with the rare adventure of the Disciplinants, which he happily accomplished with the sweat of his brow


                    Don Quixote - The Second Part
(1)

 

Author's Preface to the Second Part
 

Notes pertaining to the Second Part
 

I. Of what passed between the Priest, the Barber, and Don Quixote, concerning his indisposition
II. Which treats of the notable quarrel between Sancho Panza and Don Quixote' s Niece and House-keeper , with other pleasant occurrences
III. Of the pleasant conversation which passed between Don Quixote, Sancho Panza, and the bachelor Sampson Carrasco
IV. Wherein Sancho Panza answers the bachelor Sampson Carrasco' s doubts and questions; with other incidents worthy to be known and recited
V. Of the wise and pleasant discourse, which passed between Sancho Panza and his Wife Teresa Panza
VI. Of what passed between Don Quixote, his Niece, and Housekeeper; one of the most important chapters of the whole history
VII. Of what passed between Don Quixote and his Squire, with other most famous occurrences
VIII. Wherein is related what befell Don Quixote, as he was going to visit his Lady Dulcinea del Toboso
IX. Which relates what will be found in it
X. Wherein is related the cunning used by Sancho in enchanting the Lady Dulcinea, with other events as ridiculous as true
XI. Of the strange adventure which befell the valorous Don Quixote with the wain or cart of the Parliament of Death
XII. Of the strange adventure, which befell the valorous Don Quixote, with the brave Knight of the Looking-glasses
XIII. Wherein is continued the adventure of the Knight of the Wood, with the wise, new, and pleasant dialogue between the two Squires
XIV. In which is continued the adventure of the Knight of the Wood
XV. Giving an account, who the Knight of the Looking-glasses and his Squire were
XVI. Of what befell Don Quixote with a discreet Gentleman of La Mancha
XVII. Wherein is set forth the last and highest point, at which the unheard-of courage of Don Quixote ever did, or could, arrive; with the happy conclusion of the adventure of the lions
XVIII. Of what befell Don Quixote in the castle or house of the Knight of the Green Riding-Coat, with other extravagant matters
XIX. Wherein is related the adventure of the enamoured Shepherd, with other truly pleasant accidents
XX. Giving an account of the wedding of Camacho the Rich, with the adventure of Basilius the Poor
XXI. In which is continued the history of Camacho' s wedding, with other delightful accidents
XXII. Wherein is related the grand adventure of the cave of Montesinos, lying in the heart of La Mancha, to which the valorous Don Quixote gave a happy conclusion
XXIII. Of the wonderful things, which the unexampled Don Quixote de la Mancha declared he had seen in the deep cave of Montesinos, the greatness and impossibility of which make this adventure pass for apocryphal
XXIV. In which are recounted a thousand impertinences necessary to the right understanding of this grand history
XXV. Wherein is begun the braying adventure, with the pleasant one of the Puppet-Player, and the memorable divinations of the Divining Ape
XXVI. Wherein is contained the pleasant adventure of the Puppet-player, with sundry other matters in truth sufficiently good
XXVII. Wherein is related who Master Peter and his Ape were; with the ill success Don Quixote had in the braying adventure, which he finished not as he wished and intended
XXVIII. Of things which, Benengeli says, he who reads them will know, if he reads them with attention
XXIX. Of the famous adventure of the enchanted barque
XXX. Of what befell Don Quixote with a fair huntress
XXXI. Which treats of many and great things
XXXII. Of the answer Don Quixote gave to his reprover, with other grave and pleasant events
XXXIII. Of the relishing conversation which passed between the Duchess, her Damsels, and Sancho Panza; worthy to be read and remarked
XXXIV. Giving an account of the method prescribed for disenchanting the peerless Dulcinea del Toboso: which is one of the most famous adventures of this book
XXXV. Wherein is continued the account of the method prescribed to Don Quixote for the disenchanting Dulcinea, with other wonderful events
XXXVI. Wherein is related the strange and never-imagined adventure of the Afflicted Matron, alias the Countess of Trifaldi, with a letter written by Sancho Panza to his Wife Teresa Panza
XXXVII. In which is continued the famous adventure of the Afflicted Matron
XXXVIII. In which an account is given of the Afflicted Matron's misfortune
XXXIX. Wherein Trifaldi continues her stupendous and memorable history
XL. Of matters relating and appertaining to this adventure, and to this memorable history
XLI. Of the arrival of Clavileno, with the conclusion of this prolix adventure
XLII. Of the instructions Don Quixote gave Sancho Panza before he went to govern the Island, with other matters well considered
XLIII. Of the second instructions Don Quixote gave Sancho Panza
XLIV. How Sancho Panza was carried to his Government, and of the strange adventure which befell Don Quixote in the Castle
XLV. How the great Sancho Panza took possession of his Island, and of the manner of his beginning to govern it
XLVI. Of the dreadful bell-ringing and cattish consternation Don Quixote was put into in the progress of the enamoured Altisidora's amour
XLVII. Giving a farther account of Sancho's behaviour in his Government
XLVIII. Of what befell Don Quixote with Donna Rodriguez, the Duchess's Duenna, together with other accidents worthy to be written, and had in eternal remembrance
XLIX. Of what befell Sancho Panza as he was going the round of his Island
L. In which is declared who were the Enchanters and Executioners that whipped the Duenna, and pinched and scratched Don Quixote; with the success of the Page, who carried the letter to Teresa Panza, Sancho's Wife
LI. Of the progress of Sancho Panza's Government, with other entertaining events
LII. In which is related the adventure of the second afflicted or distressed Matron, otherwise called Donna Rodriguez
LIII. Of the toilsome end and conclusion of Sancho Panza's government
LIV. Which treats of matters relating to this history, and to no other
LV. Of what befell Sancho in the way, and other matters which you have only to see
LVI. Of the prodigious and never-seen battle between Don Quixote de la Mancha and the Lackey Tosilos, in defence of the Duenna Donna Rodriguez's daughter
LVII. Which relates how Don Quixote took his leave of the Duke, and of what befell him with the witty and wanton Altisidora, one of the Duchess's Waiting-women
LVIII. Showing how adventures crowded so fast upon Don Quixote, that they trod upon one another's heels
LIX. Wherein is related an extraordinary accident which befell Don Quixote, and which may pass for an adventure
LX. Of what befell Don Quixote in his way to Barcelona
LXI. Of what befell Don Quixote at his entrance into Barcelona, with other events more true than ingenious
LXII. Which treats of the adventure of the enchanted Head, with other trifles that must not be omitted
LXIII. Of the unlucky accident which befell Sancho Panza in visiting the Galleys, and the strange adventure of the beautiful Morisca
LXIV. Treating of the adventure, which gave Don Quixote more sorrow than any which had hitherto befallen him
LXV. In which an account is given who the Knight of the White Moon was, with the liberty of Don Gregorio, and other accidents
LXVI. Treating of matters, which he who reads will see; and he who hears them read will hear
LXVII. Of the resolution Don Quixote took to turn Shepherd and lead a rural life till the year of his promise should be expired; with other accidents truly pleasant and good
LXVIII. Of the bristled adventure which befell Don Quixote
LXIX. Of the newest and strangest adventure of all that befell Don Quixote in the whole course of this grand history
LXX. Which follows the sixty-ninth, and treats of matters indispensably necessary to the perspicuity of this history
LXXI. Of what befell Don Quixote with his Squire Sancho in the way to his Village
LXXII. How Don Quixote and Sancho arrived at their Village
LXXIII. Of the omens Don Quixote met with at the entrance into his Village, with other accidents, which adorn and illustrate this great history
LXXIV. How Don Quixote fell sick, made his will, and died
   

Gavilan College celebrates 400 years of Don Quijote

Don Quixote de la Mancha, translated by Charles Jarvis

Gavilan Spanish Questions or comments Bibliographic Record Top Next page   

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